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Presenter: James Graham
Crab Bay Community Resource Management Initiative, Vanuatu

The Malekula Island community launched the Crab Bay Community Resource Management Initiative in 2000 to halt the decline of the local marine ecosystem. With the closure of six hundred hectares of fishing area and the provision of village-based education in sustainable resource management, the initiative has successfully replenished the local land crab population. With over 90% of the community involved in the project, the number of crab burrows has increased eightfold and the number of Trochi (seashells) has grown fivefold in only two years. The revitalized local fishery supplies the community with food and the sale of surpluses has led to increased income which has gone largely towards children's school fees, and basic health services.

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Presenter: Emma Celeste Flor Gil
Asociaci�n de Mujeres de Isabela "Pescado Azul", Gal�pagos Islands, Ecuador

This women's cooperative on the Island of Isabela in the Gal�pagos Islands is providing jobs for unemployed women and sustainable economic alternatives for fishermen. Traditionally, the fishermen have relied on declining coastal sea cucumber, lobster, and shark populations for their livelihood. The Mujeres de Isabela association provides an alternative by creating a market for tuna, a migratory species, which is processed, smoked and sold to tourists. The project also contributes to the conservation of the Galapagos by using guava wood, a destructive invasive species, to smoke the fish.

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Presenter: Gildas Andriamalala
The Village of Andavadoaka, Madagascar

Economic and environmental factors in Madagascar's village of Andavadoaka were threatening the local octopus population, putting a major strain on the village's traditional source of livelihood. In response, village leaders teamed up with marine conservationists to stabilize the species. Combining traditional knowledge with modern science, the two parties formulated a plan involving seasonal bans on octopus fishing. As a result of this project, the average octopus size and catch has increased steadily. The project is being used as a model in the development of a marine protected area network that incorporates twelve nearby villages.

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Presenter: Gilberto Naranjo
CoopeT�rcoles R.L. - Cooperativa de Pescadores Artesanales de T�rcoles Artisan Fishing Cooperative of T�rcoles, Costa Rica

The first fishing cooperative in Central America to develop a Code of Responsible Fishing, CoopeT�rcoles R.L. works to preserve local fishery customs in order to ensure the sustainability of fishing and conservation of sea life. Since 90% of the population in T�rcoles makes their living off the fishery, it is of utmost importance to maintain the viability of this resource. CoopeT�rcoles provides a conservation education database for local fishermen to keep track of catches and monitor endangered species. They also work with various institutions to gain national recognition, and partner with hotels to provide guided tours of the fishing cooperative to promote a better understanding of local fishing practices.

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Presenter: Nelson Bako
Arnavone Community Marine Conservation Area, Solomon Islands

In 1996 in the face of concern over the serious decline of their marine resources, three Solomon Island Communities, Kia, Wagina and Katupika villages worked together to establish the Arnavon Community Marine Conservation Area (ACMCA). The ACMCA embraces an area of 157 Km2,includes several islands which are also globally significant nesting habitat of the endangered Hawksbill sea turtle. These islands were traditionally a "storehouse" of marine resources on which these three communities could rely in times of need. Although the communities are culturally and socially different, they put aside traditional suspicions and animosity and came together for the common purpose of establishing the first community managed marine conservation area in the Solomon Islands, and indeed, the Pacific Islands region. They established the ACMCA Management Committee as an equal forum for managing the ACMCA and employed 6 local young men as Conservaton Officers. Twelve years later, the ACMCA is an iconic example of a community managed conservation area in the Pacific and the flagship for conservation in the Solomon Islands. It is used for local high school trips, generates some tourism income and is the finest example of a sustainable funded and managed community MPA in the Pacific.


Presenter: Benny Gowep
Sepik Wetlands Management Initiative (SWMI), Papua New Guinea

Fire-related environmental degradation and unsustainable harvesting practices in the wetlands of the upper Sepik River in Papau New Guinea threatened the crocodile population, a valuable resource to local communities. In response, the communities partnered with the government, NGOs, and businesses to find a solution. SWMI established guidelines for the sustainable harvest of crocodile eggs, and oversees protective measures for nesting crocodiles and their habitat. These activities have led to a reassuring rise in the crocodile population as revenue from the sustainable harvest of crocodile skins and eggs provides valued income to the stakeholder communities.

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